Parque nacional Nahuel Huapi

( Nahuel Huapi National Park )

Nahuel Huapi National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi) is the oldest national park in Argentina, established in 1922 as Parque Nacional de Sud and reconfiguered in 1934. It surrounds Nahuel Huapi Lake in the foothills of the Patagonian Andes. The largest of the national parks in the region, it has an area of 7,050 km2 (2,720 sq mi), or nearly 2 million acres. Its landscapes represent the north Patagonian Andean Zone consisting of three types, namely, the Altoandino (with perpetual snow above an altitude of 1,600 metres (5,200 ft)), the Andino-Patagónico (in the lower reaches of the hills) and the Patagonian steppe. It also represents small parts of the Valdivian Rainforest.

The park and the reserve lie at an altitude of 720–3,574 metres (2,362–11,726 ft), and are designated under IUCN management categories II (National Park) and IV (Management Reserve). The park is completely protected while the reserve is partially protected. ...Read more

Nahuel Huapi National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi) is the oldest national park in Argentina, established in 1922 as Parque Nacional de Sud and reconfiguered in 1934. It surrounds Nahuel Huapi Lake in the foothills of the Patagonian Andes. The largest of the national parks in the region, it has an area of 7,050 km2 (2,720 sq mi), or nearly 2 million acres. Its landscapes represent the north Patagonian Andean Zone consisting of three types, namely, the Altoandino (with perpetual snow above an altitude of 1,600 metres (5,200 ft)), the Andino-Patagónico (in the lower reaches of the hills) and the Patagonian steppe. It also represents small parts of the Valdivian Rainforest.

The park and the reserve lie at an altitude of 720–3,574 metres (2,362–11,726 ft), and are designated under IUCN management categories II (National Park) and IV (Management Reserve). The park is completely protected while the reserve is partially protected. The national park is dominated by the high mountain chain of the Andes, many lakes, rapid rivers, waterfalls, snow-clad peaks, glaciers and extensive forests. It is bordered by Chile on its western side.

The earliest discovery of Nahuel Huapi by the non-indigenous peoples is linked to the conquest of Chile. In the summer of 1552–1553, the Governor of Chile Pedro de Valdivia sent Francisco de Villagra to explore the area east of the Andes at the latitudes of the city of Valdivia. Francisco de Villagra crossed the Andes through Mamuil Malal Pass and headed south until reaching Limay River in the vicinity of Nahuel Huapi Lake.[1]

In colonial times explorers in the search for the legendary "Ciudad de Los Cesares" visited the zone and Jesuit missionaries coming from Chiloé Archipelago established a precarious mission on the shores of the lake.[1][2] Quinoa is known to have been cultivated near the shores of the lake during this period.[3]

In the 1870s and 1880s Perito Moreno undertook a series of exploration trips into Patagonia. Later he worked for the Argentine government's boundary commission. In short —Perito Morenos‘ explorations and work were fundamental for securing Argentine sovereignty of the Nahuel Huapi area.[4] As compensation for his services Perito Moreno was granted a huge tract of land around Nahuel Huapi Lake.[4]

In 1903, Perito Moreno donated 75 square kilometres (29 sq mi) of land in the area to the federal government.[2] At the same time he proposed the creation of a national park.[4] A decree of February 1, 1909 recognized that the area needed protection[2] then in 1916 works begun to establish a park and it finally opened in 1922 as Parque Nacional del Sur.[4] The total surface of the incipient national park in 1916 surpassed that of the donations of Perito Moreno. It was not until October 9, 1934 that Nahuel Huapi National Park acquired it present name.[4] At the same time in 1934 the Iguazú National Park was established in Argentina.[2]

One of the main objectives of the civilizing visions of the National Parks Direction established in 1934 was the urban development of the small settlement of San Carlos de Bariloche on the shores of Lake Nahuel Huapi, which had been connected to the Argentine railway network in 1934. Bustillo clearly articulated the pretension of building a new orderly city that would act as a bulwark for the colonization of Patagonia, and placed it in a historical line that began with the war of conquest against the Mapuche at the end of the 19th century. Touristification was the main aim of the National Park Direction, establishing the luxury hotel Llao-Llao. [5] [6][7] In the first year of the National Park Service, 1935, several regulations were implemented that affected Nahuel Huapi. These included construction code, standardization of drinking water sanitation, and issuance of vendor permits.[8] The area opened up for mountain climbing, sport fishing, ski and other recreational activities after the park was established.[9] [10]

^ a b Urbina, M.X.C. (4 April 2014). "The frustrated strategic mission of nahuelhuapi, a point in patagonia's' immensity". Magallania. doi:10.4151/6863 (inactive 31 January 2024). hdl:10.4151/6863.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: DOI inactive as of January 2024 (link) ^ a b c d Kuno Thomasson (1959). Nahuel Huapi: plankton of some lakes in an Argentine national park, with notes on terrestrial vegetation. Almqvist & Wiksells boktr. p. ii. Retrieved 19 February 2011. ^ Pardo B., Oriana; Pizarro, José Luis (2014). Chile: Plantas alimentarias Prehispánicas (in Spanish) (2015 ed.). Arica, Chile: Ediciones Parina. pp. 146–150. ISBN 9789569120022. ^ a b c d e Scarzanella, Eugenia (2002). "Las bellezas naturales y la nación: Los parques nacionales en Argentina en la primera mitad del siglo XX" [Natural beauties and the nation: National parks in Argentina in the first half of the 20th century]. Revista Europea de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe (in Spanish) (73): 5–21. JSTOR 25675985. ^ Kaltmeier, Olaf (2021). National Parks from North to South. An Entangled History of Conservation and Colonization in Argentina. Trier, New Orleans: WVT, UNO. ^ Tourism Policy in 20th-century Argentina ^ Oyola-Yemaiel, p. 74 ^ Oyola-Yemaiel, Arthur (December 1999). The Early Conservation Movement in Argentina and the National Park Service: A Brief History of Conservation, Development, Tourism and Sovereignty. Universal-Publishers. pp. 71–. ISBN 978-1-58112-098-1. Retrieved 20 February 2011. ^ PARQUE NACIONAL NAHUEL HUAPI: Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi: Trekking Trekking, Retrieved 21 February 2011 ^ Kaltmeier, Olaf. "The Dark Side of a White Sport". Retrieved 31 July 2023.
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