309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group

The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (309th AMARG), often called The Boneyard, is a United States Air Force aircraft and missile storage and maintenance facility in Tucson, Arizona, located on Davis–Monthan Air Force Base. The 309th AMARG was previously Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center, and the Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center.

The 309th AMARG takes care of nearly 4,000 aircraft, which makes it the largest aircraft storage and preservation facility in the world. An Air Force Materiel Command unit, the group is under the command of the Ogden Air Logistics Complex at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The 309th AMARG was originally meant to store excess Department of Defense and Coast Guard aircraft, but has in recent years been designated the sole repository of out-of-service aircraft from all branches of the US government. The facility has also received US-made foreign military aircraft...Read more

The 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (309th AMARG), often called The Boneyard, is a United States Air Force aircraft and missile storage and maintenance facility in Tucson, Arizona, located on Davis–Monthan Air Force Base. The 309th AMARG was previously Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center, and the Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center.

The 309th AMARG takes care of nearly 4,000 aircraft, which makes it the largest aircraft storage and preservation facility in the world. An Air Force Materiel Command unit, the group is under the command of the Ogden Air Logistics Complex at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The 309th AMARG was originally meant to store excess Department of Defense and Coast Guard aircraft, but has in recent years been designated the sole repository of out-of-service aircraft from all branches of the US government. The facility has also received US-made foreign military aircraft such as the Boeing CC-137 (from RCAF for use in the E-8 JSTARS program) and the Lockheed CP-140A Arcturus (2 from RCAF). The arid climate of the region makes the 309th AMARG an ideal location for storing aircraft, as there is very little humidity in the air that would corrode metal. Furthermore, the surface is hard so that the aircraft do not sink into the ground.

Aircraft storage at Davis-Monthan Field began when the 4105th Army Air Forces Base Unit (Aircraft Storage) was organized in 1945, to house Boeing B-29 Superfortress and Douglas C-47 Skytrain aircraft.[1] Davis–Monthan Field was chosen because of Tucson's low humidity, infrequent rainfall, alkaline soil, and high altitude of 2,550 feet (780 m), reducing rust and corrosion.[2][3] The hard soil makes it possible to move aircraft around without having to pave the storage areas.

In 1949, after the Air Force's creation as a separate service, the unit was redesignated as the 3040th Aircraft Storage Depot, and later 3040 Aircraft Storage Squadron. On 1 Jun 1956, the 3040 Aircraft Storage Squadron was discontinued. In 1965, the Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center was organized and tasked with processing aircraft for all the United States armed forces, not just the Air Force. The Navy had operated its own boneyard at Naval Air Station Litchfield Park at Goodyear, Arizona, for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard aircraft. In February 1965, some 500 aircraft were moved from Litchfield Park to Davis–Monthan. NAS Litchfield Park was finally closed in 1968.[4]

In the 1980s, the center began processing intercontinental ballistic missiles for dismantling or reuse in satellite launches, and was renamed the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center (AMARC) to reflect the expanded focus on all aerospace assets.[5]

In the 1990s, in accordance with the START I treaty, the center was tasked with eliminating 365 Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bombers.[6] The progress of this task was to be verified by Russia via satellite and first-person inspection at the facility. Initially, the B-52s were chopped into pieces with a 13,000 pound guillotine winched by a steel cable supported by a crane.[7] Later on, the tool of choice became K-12 rescue saws.[citation needed] This more precise technique afforded AMARC with salvageable spare parts.

In May 2007, the AMARC was transferred to the 309th Maintenance Wing, and the center was renamed the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG).[8]

 McDonnell F-4C-20-MC Phantom II AF Serial No. 63-7602 of the 4455th CCTS/4453d Combat Crew Training Wing, 16 July 1970. Aircraft was scrapped at Hill AFB, UT November 1986Lineage Constituted on 7 October 1964 as The Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center Activated on 1 February 1965 Redesignated Aerospace Maintenance & Regeneration Center on 1 October 1985 Redesignated 309th Aerospace Maintenance & Regeneration Group on 2 May 2007[9]Predecessors 3040th Aircraft Storage SquadronDesignated as the 4105th Army Air Forces Base Unit (Aircraft Storage) and organized on 15 November 1945 Redesignated 4105th Air Force Base Unit (Aircraft Storage) on 26 September 1947 Redesignated 3040th Aircraft Storage Depot on 28 August 1948 Redesignated 3040th Aircraft Storage Squadron Discontinued on 1 June 1956[10]Arizona Aircraft Storage SquadronDesignated as the Arizona Aircraft Storage Squadron and organized on 1 June 1956 Discontinued on 1 August 1959[11]2704th Air Force Aircraft Storage and Disposition GroupDesignated as the 2704th Air Force Aircraft Storage and Disposition Group and organized on 1 August 1959 Discontinued on 1 February 1965[10]Assignments Air Force Logistics Command, 7 October 1964 Air Force Materiel Command, 1 July 1992 309th Maintenance Wing, 2 May 2007 (attached to Ogden Air Logistics Complex after 12 July 2012) Ogden Air Logistics Complex, 1 October 2012 – present[9]
^ USAF AMARC Fact Sheet Archived 21 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Hanbury Evans Newill Vlattas and Company (January 1998). "Design Compatibility Standards Davis – Monthan Air Force Base Tucson, Arizona" (PDF). U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 January 2009. Retrieved 28 December 2009. ^ Napolitano, J. (May 2005). "Arizona's Military Installations: Ready for the Transformation of the Department of Defense" (PDF). azgovernor.gov. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 November 2009. Retrieved 26 December 2009. ^ "U.S. Navy Naval Aviation News July 1966, p. 18" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 June 2011. Retrieved 19 February 2011. ^ AMARC Experience Story Archived 28 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine. ^ "START Treaty" (PDF). U.S. Department of State. 31 July 1991. Retrieved 28 December 2009. ^ Norris, R.S. (1995). "Nuclear Notebook". Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 51 (1): 69. doi:10.1080/00963402.1995.11658033. ^ Cite error: The named reference 309AMRG was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ a b Cite error: The named reference 309AMARGfacts was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ a b See Mueller, p. 103 (listing units at Davis–Monthan AFB) ^ "Abstract, History The Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center, April 1946 – May 1974". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 December 2013.
Photographies by:
Statistics: Position
2921
Statistics: Rank
40840

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
Security
198246357Click/tap this sequence: 7163
Esta pregunta es para comprobar si usted es un visitante humano y prevenir envíos de spam automatizado.

Google street view

Where can you sleep near 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group ?

Booking.com
571.098 visits in total, 9.238 Points of interest, 405 Destinations, 216 visits today.