Sedona, Arizona

Sedona is a city that straddles the county line between Coconino and Yavapai counties in the northern Verde Valley region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 10,031. It is within the Coconino National Forest.

Sedona's main attraction is its array of red sandstone formations. The formations appear to glow in brilliant orange and red when illuminated by the rising or setting sun. The red rocks form a popular backdrop for many activities, ranging from spiritual pursuits to the hundreds of hiking and mountain biking trails. Sedona is also the home to the nationally recognized McDonald's with turquoise arches, instead of the traditional Golden Arches.

Sedona was named after Sedona Schnebly whose husband, Theodore Carlton Schnebly, was the city's first postmaster. She was celebrated for her hospitality and industriousness. Her mother, Amanda Miller, claimed to have made the name up because ...Read more

Sedona is a city that straddles the county line between Coconino and Yavapai counties in the northern Verde Valley region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 10,031. It is within the Coconino National Forest.

Sedona's main attraction is its array of red sandstone formations. The formations appear to glow in brilliant orange and red when illuminated by the rising or setting sun. The red rocks form a popular backdrop for many activities, ranging from spiritual pursuits to the hundreds of hiking and mountain biking trails. Sedona is also the home to the nationally recognized McDonald's with turquoise arches, instead of the traditional Golden Arches.

Sedona was named after Sedona Schnebly whose husband, Theodore Carlton Schnebly, was the city's first postmaster. She was celebrated for her hospitality and industriousness. Her mother, Amanda Miller, claimed to have made the name up because "it sounded pretty".

Anglo-American settlement

The first Anglo settler, John J. Thompson, moved to Oak Creek Canyon in 1876, an area well known for its peach and apple orchards. The early settlers were farmers and ranchers. In 1902, when the Sedona post office was established, there were 55 residents. In the mid-1950s, the first telephone directory listed 155 names. Some parts of the Sedona area were not electrified until the 1960s.

Sedona began to develop as a tourist destination, vacation-home and retirement center in the 1950s. Most of the development seen today was constructed in the 1980s and 1990s. As of 2007, there are no large tracts of undeveloped land remaining.[1]

Important early settlers included the Steele family, originally of Scotland.

Chapel of the Holy Cross

In 1956, construction of the Chapel of the Holy Cross was completed. The chapel rises 70 feet (21 m) out of a 1,000-foot (300 m) redrock cliff.[2] The most prominent feature of the chapel is the cross. Later a chapel was added. Inside the chapel there is a window and a cross with benches and pews.[3]

Cinematic legacy

Sedona played host to more than sixty Hollywood productions from the first years of movies into the 1970s. Stretching as far back as 1923, Sedona's red rocks were a fixture in major Hollywood productions – including films such as Angel and the Badman, Desert Fury, Blood on the Moon, Johnny Guitar, The Last Wagon, 3:10 to Yuma and Broken Arrow. However, the surroundings typically were identified to audiences as the terrain of Texas, California, Nevada, and even Canada–US border territory.[4] The town lent its name to the 2011 film Sedona, which is set in the community.

Brins Fire  The Brins fire of 2006

On June 18, 2006, a wildfire, reportedly started by campers, began about one mile (2 km) north of Sedona.[5] The Brins Fire covered 4,317 acres (17 km2) on Brins Mesa, Wilson Mountain and in Oak Creek Canyon before the USDA Forest Service declared it 100 percent contained on June 28. Containment cost was estimated at $6.4 million.[6]

Slide Fire

On May 20, 2014, a wildfire started from an unknown cause began north of Sedona at Slide Rock State Park. The Slide Fire[7] spread across 21,227 acres in Oak Creek Canyon over nine days and prompted evacuations.[8] State Route 89A opened to Flagstaff in June, but all parking and canyon access was closed to the public until October 1, 2014.[9]

^ Heidinger & Trevillyan (2007). Images of America: Sedona, Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7385-4800-5 ^ "Chapel of the Holy Cross". Sacred Destinations. April 18, 2009. Retrieved May 18, 2010. ^ Somerville, Slyvia. "Chapel of the Holy Cross, Sedona Architectural Landmark". Gateway To Sedona. Range Dog Publishing Inc. Archived from the original on February 11, 2017. Retrieved February 9, 2017. ^ McNeill, Joe. "Arizona's Little Hollywood: Sedona and Northern Arizona's Forgotten Film History 1923–1973" (2010, Northedge & Sons) ^ USDA Forest Service. (June 19, 2006). Brins Fire Update. Retrieved December 16, 2006. ^ "BRINS FIRE UPDATE" (PDF). Coconino National Forest. June 29, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 5, 2010. ^ "Slide Fire Information – InciWeb the Incident Information System". inciweb.nwcg.gov. Archived from the original on April 25, 2018. Retrieved April 24, 2018. ^ Graham, Christopher Fox. "Oak Creek Canyon evacuated north of Slide Rock due to fire o". www.redrocknews.com – Sedona Red Rock News. Archived from the original on April 25, 2018. Retrieved April 24, 2018. ^ "Oak Creek Canyon near Sedona to reopen Wednesday". azcentral. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
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