Hisor (Tajik: Ҳисор, Persian: حصار) or Hisar (Russian: Гиссар, Gissar) is a city in western Tajikistan, about 15 km west of Dushanbe. The city was the seat of the former Hisar District, and is part of the Districts of Republican Subordination. It lies at an altitude of 799–824 m, surrounded by high mountains (Gissar Range to the north, Babatag and Aktau ranges to the south). The river Khanaka, a tributary to the Kofarnihon, flows through the town. Its population is estimated at 29,100 for the city proper and 308,100 for the city with the outlying communities (2020). As of 2002, its population was composed 81.6% of Tajiks, 12.3% Uzbeks, 3.6% Russians, and 2.5% others.

Hisor (Tajik: Ҳисор, Persian: حصار) or Hisar (Russian: Гиссар, Gissar) is a city in western Tajikistan, about 15 km west of Dushanbe. The city was the seat of the former Hisar District, and is part of the Districts of Republican Subordination. It lies at an altitude of 799–824 m, surrounded by high mountains (Gissar Range to the north, Babatag and Aktau ranges to the south). The river Khanaka, a tributary to the Kofarnihon, flows through the town. Its population is estimated at 29,100 for the city proper and 308,100 for the city with the outlying communities (2020). As of 2002, its population was composed 81.6% of Tajiks, 12.3% Uzbeks, 3.6% Russians, and 2.5% others.

The fort of Hisar, residence of the Bukharan governor, is said to date back to Cyrus the Great and to have been captured twenty one times.[1]

In 1504 the region was conquered by Muhammad Shaybani.[2] Babur briefly conquered Hisar in 1511, but came back under control of the Uzbeks not long after. Hisar became a semi-independent principality in the next few decades and was ruled by a sultan, furnishing troops for Bukhara's military campaigns.[2] In the 17th century the Tajiks became the dominant power in the region, obtaining the governorship of Hisar. During this period the Bukharan khanate was split between the khan in Bukhara and the ruler (usually one of his relatives) in Balkh, and Hisar was generally subordinate to the latter. The decline of Bukharan power after the assassination of Ubaydullah Khan in 1711 resulted in Hisor asserting its independence.[2]

Hisar was made a city on June 26, 1993.

^ "Hisor and Hisar Fortress travel guide". Caravanistan. Retrieved 2019-08-23. ^ a b c Wilde, Andreas (2016). What is Beyond the River?: Power, Authority, and Social Order in Transoxania 18th-19th Centuries. Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. ISBN 978-3-7001-7866-8.
Photographies by:
Hans Birger Nilsen - CC BY-SA 2.0
Maris Teteris - CC BY 3.0
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