The Venetian Las Vegas is a luxury hotel and casino resort located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada, United States. It is owned by Vici Properties and operated by Apollo Global Management. It was developed by businessman Sheldon Adelson through his company, Las Vegas Sands. The Venetian was built on the former site of the Sands Hotel and Casino, which was closed and demolished in 1996.

Construction on the Venetian began in April 1997, and the resort opened on May 4, 1999. Some amenities had yet to be finished, with construction continuing until the end of the year. Subcontractors later filed mechanic's liens against the resort for unpaid work, leading to lengthy litigation. The Venetian also feuded with the Culinary Workers Union regarding Adelson's decision to open the property as a non-union resort.

The Venetian was designed by Stubbins Associates and Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo. The resort is themed after Venice and has replicas of numerous land...Read more

The Venetian Las Vegas is a luxury hotel and casino resort located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada, United States. It is owned by Vici Properties and operated by Apollo Global Management. It was developed by businessman Sheldon Adelson through his company, Las Vegas Sands. The Venetian was built on the former site of the Sands Hotel and Casino, which was closed and demolished in 1996.

Construction on the Venetian began in April 1997, and the resort opened on May 4, 1999. Some amenities had yet to be finished, with construction continuing until the end of the year. Subcontractors later filed mechanic's liens against the resort for unpaid work, leading to lengthy litigation. The Venetian also feuded with the Culinary Workers Union regarding Adelson's decision to open the property as a non-union resort.

The Venetian was designed by Stubbins Associates and Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo. The resort is themed after Venice and has replicas of numerous landmarks from the city, including a canal with gondola rides. The Venetian includes a 120,000 sq ft (11,000 m2) casino and opened with 3,036 suites in a 35-story tower. A 12-story tower, the Venezia, was completed in 2003, bringing the room count to 4,049. The Palazzo, a sister property with its own hotel and casino, opened north of the Venetian in 2007. If considered as a single property, the Venetian-Palazzo complex ranks as the second-largest hotel in the world, with approximately 7,100 rooms.

The Venetian was built to accommodate convention-goers in particular, as Adelson felt that this demographic was underserved in Las Vegas. The resort includes its own meeting space, as well as the adjoining Venetian Expo. The property also includes the Grand Canal Shoppes, and was home to the Guggenheim Hermitage Museum from 2001 to 2008. The Venetian has several performance venues, which have hosted entertainment such as the Blue Man Group (2005–2012), Phantom: The Las Vegas Spectacular (2006–2012), and Human Nature (2013–2020). A sphere-shaped venue and arena, known as simply Sphere, opened in September 2023.

By the end of 2020, Las Vegas Sands sought to focus on its Macau properties, which include The Venetian Macao. In February 2022, Apollo Global Management acquired the operations of the Venetian, Palazzo, and Venetian Expo for $2.25 billion, while Vici Properties purchased the land beneath the facilities for $4 billion.

Background and construction

The Venetian was built on land previously occupied by the Sands Hotel and Casino, which opened in 1952.[1] Las Vegas Sands, a company founded by businessman Sheldon Adelson, purchased the Sands resort in 1989.[2][3] Adelson eventually devised plans to replace the aging resort, which he felt was no longer competitive with newer properties.[4] The Sands closed in June 1996, and was demolished five months later to make way for the Venetian.[5]

Construction began on April 14, 1997, with a low-key groundbreaking ceremony.[6] Lehrer McGovern Bovis served as the general contractor.[7] Work began without the issuance of final permits, a strategy used by several previous resorts on the Strip. The Venetian's foundation was poured two months after groundbreaking,[8] followed by the construction of three stories. Further work could not begin until the approval of a traffic study.[9][10] An extranet was used during construction to keep the project on schedule. It contained 4,500 items, including photos, illustrations, legal documents, and budgets. Project team members, based in various locations, could access the items via the extranet, increasing efficiency.[11]

A key demographic would be convention-goers,[12][13] whom Adelson considered underserved in Las Vegas.[14] At the end of 1997, the project acquired $523 million in funding through the sale of bonds.[15] The final cost was $1.5 billion.[16][17] Financial analysts were skeptical about whether the resort would be finished,[18] while gambling executives questioned Adelson's decision to focus on business travelers and conventions. Up to that time, gambling had been the most significant revenue generator in Las Vegas.[19][20] The Venetian was expected to employ more than 4,000 people,[21] and it saw more than 100,000 applications.[22]

Safety at the construction site was questioned after several incidents, including a worker death in January 1998, which occurred as the result of a fall.[7][23] At the end of the year, another worker was crushed and killed by an 8,000-pound facade, which fell 32 stories while being lifted by a crane.[24] In February 1999, a trio of workers had to be rescued from the hotel tower's exterior after a cable for their scaffolding became tangled by high winds, stranding the workers 22 stories above ground.[25] In March 1999, a natural gas leak occurred on-site after workers accidentally struck a line, closing one block of the Strip for two hours.[26] The following day, an electrician died after falling more than 30 feet through an open hole, marking the third death since the start of construction.[23][27] Bovis had previously been fined $9,300 for safety violations which included a lack of fall protection near holes.[7]

Opening

The opening was initially scheduled for April 21, 1999.[28] Adelson had wanted it to open a week earlier to accommodate convention-goers who were booked at the hotel.[28][29] However, both opening dates were delayed due to ongoing construction work, as well as building inspections by the county.[30][31][32] As a result, 900 convention guests had to be transferred to other hotels.[28]

A soft opening was eventually scheduled for May 3, 1999.[31] A private opening ceremony was held that morning and attended by thousands of VIP guests, including actress Sophia Loren and more than 500 journalists from around the world.[33][16][34] County inspections delayed the public opening until 12:45 a.m. the following day.[34][35] It was one of three new resorts to open on the Strip in 1999, along with Mandalay Bay and Paris Las Vegas.[22]

Because construction was still ongoing, the resort opened without all of its amenities, including a retail mall and some restaurants.[17][36] Much of the hotel tower was also unavailable initially, due to the inspection work. Because of this, many guests were sent to other resorts.[35][37][38] Hotel inspections continued for several days after the opening, with only the first six floors and 320 rooms approved to operate.[39] Construction continued after the opening,[36][40] and concluded in December 1999.[41] The resort did not receive a permanent certificate of occupancy until June 2001.[42]

Construction litigation

Shortly after the opening, numerous subcontractors alleged that they were owed money for work performed on the Venetian. More than $230 million in mechanic's liens were filed, including $145 million from Lehrer McGovern Bovis, which also filed a fraud lawsuit against the resort. The Venetian stated that it was not responsible for covering subcontractor costs, according to its contract with Bovis. The resort also said that, despite Adelson's request, Bovis had failed to acquire mechanics-lien waivers when hiring subcontractors.[43][44][45] According to Bovis, the Venetian had made more than 400 design changes during the final eight months of construction, while denying requests for construction extensions.[46]

In July 1999, the resort filed a $50 million federal lawsuit against Bovis over the liens, as well as breach of contract. The resort claimed that its reputation had been damaged by the scattered opening of its amenities.[47] Bovis filed its $145 million lien the following month.[48] Both sides subsequently agreed to try resolving the dispute out of court.[49] However, this did not pan out.[50] A civil jury trial eventually began in August 2002, lasting 10 months. It was the longest-running civil jury trial and the largest construction lien case in Nevada history.[42][51] The trial concluded in June 2003, when jurors found both the Venetian and Bovis in breach of contract. For incomplete and defective construction work, Bovis had to pay $2.3 million in damages to the resort, which was also ordered to pay $44.2 million to Bovis.[52][53][54] Las Vegas Sands appealed the decision,[55] and eventually reached an agreement with Bovis in 2005.[56]

Subsequent years

By 2002, Condé Nast Traveler had named the Venetian as one of North America's top 20 hotels. It had also received Four Diamond and Four Star ratings from American Automobile Association and Mobil Travel Guide respectively.[57][58][59] As of 2004, the Venetian was among the most profitable resorts in Las Vegas, second to the Bellagio.[20] A Chinese counterpart, The Venetian Macao, opened in Macau in 2007.[60][61] That year, the Las Vegas location also added a sister property, The Palazzo.[62] In 2020, readers of USA Today ranked the Venetian and Palazzo among the 10 best casinos in Las Vegas.[63]

In 2004, the Venetian agreed to pay a $1 million penalty to settle a 12-count Gaming Control Board complaint. One of the complaints alleged the resort had held a drawing for a Mercedes-Benz that was rigged to be won by a high roller who had lost a large amount in the casino. The executives involved were fired.[64][65][66]

On the morning of October 10, 2012, a man entered a closed gaming area and acquired $1.6 million in casino chips from a locked box that he broke open. He left the resort unnoticed, and the theft was not discovered until the following morning. He was arrested later in the month, with authorities recovering $396,000 in chips.[67][68]

In 2013, Las Vegas Sands reached a non-prosecution agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, following a two-year investigation into money laundering at the Venetian. Zhenli Ye Gon, a businessman and high-stakes gambler suspected of drug trafficking, had made numerous large deposits at the casino in 2006 and 2007. Las Vegas Sands acknowledged that it failed to take the matter seriously, and agreed to pay $47.4 million to the Department of Justice.[69][70]

Like other casinos in Nevada, the Venetian closed indefinitely in March 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on the state.[71][72] The following month, the resort announced plans to incorporate emergency medical personnel and automatic camera-based body temperature scans into its eventual reopening,[73][74][75] which occurred on June 4, 2020.[76]

By the end of 2020, Las Vegas Sands wanted to focus on its operations in Macau, as Asia was expected to recover from the pandemic's impact at a faster rate. The company was in early discussions to sell the Venetian, the Palazzo, and the adjoining Sands Expo.[77][78] Adelson died in January 2021, and Las Vegas Sands announced two months later that it would sell the three Las Vegas facilities for $6.25 billion. Through the deal, Vici Properties bought the land under the facilities for $4 billion, and Apollo Global Management acquired the operations for $2.25 billion as part of a triple net lease agreement with Vici.[79][80][81] The sale was finalized in February 2022.[82]

^ Moon Reed, C. (October 15, 2020). "Historian David Schwartz's latest book revisits a classic Las Vegas casino". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved May 9, 2023. ^ "Lewin license". Reno Gazette-Journal. February 24, 1989. Retrieved May 9, 2023 – via Newspapers.com. ^ Cite error: The named reference Told was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ "NV to build $1.5 bil. 'Venetian' resort". The Park Record. Associated Press. June 29, 1996. Retrieved May 18, 2023 – via Newspapers.com. ^ Berns, Dave (November 27, 1996). "Venice in Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved April 12, 2023. ^ Berns, Dave; Bach, Lisa Kim (April 15, 1997). "Adelson breaks ground on Venetian". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on February 21, 1999. ^ a b c Schoenmann, Joe (March 13, 1999). "Venetian site safety disputed". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ Greene, Susan (July 15, 1997). "Venetian lacking permits". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 17, 2000. ^ Greene, Susan (September 3, 1997). "County lets Venetian move ahead". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 17, 2000. ^ Greene, Susan (September 17, 1999). "Venetian permits granted". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 14, 1999. ^ Cite error: The named reference Stuart was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ "Venetian plans to take it one phase at a time". Las Vegas Review-Journal. September 8, 1997. Archived from the original on October 6, 1999. ^ Cite error: The named reference Conventions was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Cite error: The named reference Gamble was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Berns, Dave (November 7, 1997). "Bond purchase paves the way for Venetian project". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 17, 2000. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference Loren was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ a b Reynolds, Christopher (July 25, 1999). "All Bets Are Off for Debut Dates of Las Vegas Hotels". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 5, 2023. ^ Berns, Dave (August 4, 1997). "Financing, union issues remain for Venetian". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 18, 2000. ^ Binkley, Christina (December 4, 1997). "Sheldon Adelson's Venetian Rattles Las Vegas, Adding 6,000 Suites". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved May 7, 2023. ^ a b "Venetian Broke the Vegas Mold, Now Sets Trend". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. December 14, 2004. Retrieved May 7, 2023. ^ "Venetian says thousands have applied for jobs". Las Vegas Sun. January 7, 1999. Retrieved April 14, 2023. ^ a b Macy, Robert (January 27, 1999). "More than 100,000 apply for jobs at The Venetian". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved April 14, 2023. ^ a b Thompson, Gary; Zekan, Karen (March 5, 1999). "Electrician becomes third Venetian worker to die at site". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved April 14, 2023. ^ Schoenmann, Joe (December 31, 1998). "Venetian crane accident investigated". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on December 5, 1999. ^ Fairbank, Janine (February 20, 1999). "Venetian rescue called simple, fun". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on July 7, 2001. ^ "Natural gas leak in front of The Venetian closes block". Las Vegas Review-Journal. March 4, 1999. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ "Worker killed at Venetian from Henderson". Las Vegas Review-Journal. March 6, 1999. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ a b c Berns, Dave (April 7, 1999). "Venetian managers unsure of property's opening date". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ Smith, Hubble (March 22, 1999). "Almost Good Enough". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on July 7, 2001. ^ Smith, Hubble (April 21, 1999). "Venetian briefly gets a 'definite' opening date". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ a b Smith, Hubble (April 22, 1999). "Set In Stone?". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on July 7, 2001. ^ Berns, Dave (May 1, 1999). "Venetian still awaits permits needed to open megaresort". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on July 7, 2001. ^ Thompson, Gary (May 3, 1999). "Venetian scrambles to open on time". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 5, 2023. ^ a b "Inspectors permit Venetian to open". Las Vegas Review-Journal. May 4, 1999. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ a b Berns, Dave (May 5, 1999). "Venetian's full opening delayed again". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 8, 2000. ^ a b Smith, Hubble (June 7, 1999). "Venetian construction vexes tourists". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 14, 2000. ^ Cite error: The named reference Waiting was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Berns, Dave (May 15, 1999). "County officials continue tests at The Venetian". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2001. ^ Berns, Dave (May 7, 1999). "Inspections continue at Venetian". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on September 10, 1999. ^ Marks, Peter (June 13, 1999). "Playing Poker With the Medicis". The New York Times. Retrieved May 5, 2023. ^ Cite error: The named reference Simpson2000 was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ a b Smith, Hubble (May 16, 2003). "Venetian lawyer says contract vow unfulfilled". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on December 29, 2004. ^ Thompson, Gary (August 19, 1999). "Berkley vows to aid Venetian creditors". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved April 12, 2023. ^ Smith, Hubble (September 2, 1999). "Venetian contractors show anger". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on May 10, 2001. ^ Thompson, Gary (January 11, 2000). "Battle begins over Venetian cost overruns, construction payments". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved April 12, 2023. ^ Smith, Hubble (August 12, 1999). "Venetian, Bovis put suits aside". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 13, 2000. ^ Caruso, Monica (July 31, 1999). "Venetian sues for $50 million over delays". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 10, 2000. ^ Smith, Hubble (August 3, 1999). "Lien filed against Venetian". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 2, 2000. ^ Smith, Hubble (August 12, 1999). "Venetian, Bovis put suits aside". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 13, 2000. ^ Smith, Hubble (June 9, 2001). "Venetian lienholders get time to respond". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on February 25, 2002. ^ Smith, Hubble (May 15, 2003). "Lawyer claims Venetian dealt unfairly with contractor". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 6, 2003. ^ Smith, Hubble (June 4, 2003). "Venetian Trial: Contractor wins major damages". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 29, 2004. ^ Illia, Tony (June 19, 2003). "Court decision finds Venetian contractors waiting to be paid". Las Vegas Business Press. Archived from the original on October 5, 2003. ^ Smith, John L. (April 6, 2005). "Construction firm scales the heights of litigation to win Venetian judgment". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on April 13, 2005. ^ Smith, Hubble (April 7, 2005). "LV Sands still awaits decision". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 12, 2023. ^ "Venetian, Bovis Lend Lease reach agreement to resolve construction litigation". Las Vegas Review-Journal. December 31, 2005. Retrieved May 12, 2023. ^ Cite error: The named reference Counting was invoked but never defined (see the help page). ^ Robison, Jennifer (October 27, 2005). "Venetian execs starry-eyed after rating boost". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on January 2, 2006. ^ Hodge, Damon (November 23, 2009). "Venetian, Palazzo properties receive AAA Five Diamond awards". Travel Weekly. Retrieved May 20, 2023. ^ "A Venetian out to eclipse the one in Vegas". Las Vegas Sun. August 28, 2007. Retrieved May 8, 2023. ^ Katsilometes, John (November 19, 2013). "Kats in Macau: Upon arrival, the region is eerily familiar — and entirely foreign". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 8, 2023. ^ Stutz, Howard (January 1, 2008). "Officials open Palazzo casino". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 15, 2023. ^ "These are the top 10 Las Vegas casinos, according to readers". USA Today. October 20, 2020. Retrieved May 17, 2023. ^ Berns, Dave (June 11, 2002). "Venetian job losses prompt control board investigation". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on October 27, 2002. ^ Smith, Rod (February 26, 2004). "Gaming Control: Venetian to pay $1 million". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on January 22, 2005. ^ Simpson, Jeff (25 February 2004). "Venetian Settles Complaints". Las Vegas Sun. casinocitytimes.com. Retrieved 2013-03-10. ^ Planas, Antonio (October 30, 2012). "Man arrested in $1.6 million Venetian chip heist". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 8, 2023. ^ Shine, Conor (October 30, 2012). "Suspect's earlobe was key clue in Venetian chip-heist arrest". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 8, 2023. ^ O'Toole, James (August 27, 2013). "Las Vegas Sands resolves laundering case with $47 million deal". CNNMoney. Retrieved May 20, 2023. ^ Stutz, Howard (August 27, 2013). "Las Vegas Sands to return $47.4 million, avoid criminal charges". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Archived from the original on June 11, 2016. ^ Schulz, Bailey (March 17, 2020). "The Venetian, Palazzo closing until at least April 1; no layoffs or furloughs". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ "Venetian and Palazzo closing amid coronavirus crisis". Las Vegas Sun. March 17, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ Schulz, Bailey (April 28, 2020). "Venetian to have EMTs, thermal cameras upon reopening". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ Komenda, Ed (April 28, 2020). "Thermal cameras, EMTs part of Venetian's reopening plans in Las Vegas". Reno Gazette Journal. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ Horwath, Bryan (April 28, 2020). "Venetian, Palazzo to screen guests for temperatures". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ Schulz, Bailey (July 22, 2020). "Venetian launches recycling program for surgical face masks". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 10, 2023. ^ Schulz, Bailey (October 26, 2020). "Las Vegas Sands in 'very early discussions' to sell Las Vegas assets". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved March 4, 2021. ^ Komenda, Ed (October 26, 2020). "Sheldon Adelson's Las Vegas Sands in talks to sell Vegas Strip properties". Reno Gazette Journal. Retrieved May 12, 2023. ^ Velotta, Richard N. (March 3, 2021). "Sands sells Las Vegas Strip properties for $6.25B". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved March 4, 2021. ^ Chapman, Michelle (March 3, 2021). "With sale of the Venetian, Las Vegas Sands exits the Strip". Associated Press. Retrieved March 4, 2021. ^ Horwath, Bryan (March 4, 2021). "'Vote of confidence': Some experts say sale of Venetian, Palazzo and Sands Expo shows investors are bullish on Strip's recovery". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 12, 2023. ^ Velotta, Richard N. (February 23, 2022). "Las Vegas Sands closes $6.4 billion sale of Venetian to Apollo, Vici". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved May 12, 2023.
Photographies by:
Frank Schulenburg - CC BY-SA 4.0
Michael Plasmeier - CC BY-SA 2.5
Statistics: Position
7191
Statistics: Rank
8168

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
Security
893652714Click/tap this sequence: 8691
Esta pregunta es para comprobar si usted es un visitante humano y prevenir envíos de spam automatizado.

Google street view

Videos

Where can you sleep near The Venetian Las Vegas ?

Booking.com
573.674 visits in total, 9.238 Points of interest, 405 Destinations, 156 visits today.