The Danube Delta (Romanian: Delta Dunării, pronounced [ˈdelta ˈdunərij] ; Ukrainian: Дельта Дунаю, romanized: Deľta Dunayu, pronounced [delʲˈtɑ dʊnɐˈju]) is the second largest river delta in Europe, after the Volga Delta, and is the best preserved on the continent. The greater part of the Danube Delta lies in Romania (Tulcea County), with a small part in Ukraine (Odesa Oblast). Its approximate surface area is 4,152 square kilometres (1,603 square miles), of which 3,446 km2 (1,331 sq mi) is in Romania. With the lagoons of Razim–Sinoe (1,015 km2 or 392 sq mi with 865 km2 or 334 sq mi water surface), loca...Read more

The Danube Delta (Romanian: Delta Dunării, pronounced [ˈdelta ˈdunərij] ; Ukrainian: Дельта Дунаю, romanized: Deľta Dunayu, pronounced [delʲˈtɑ dʊnɐˈju]) is the second largest river delta in Europe, after the Volga Delta, and is the best preserved on the continent. The greater part of the Danube Delta lies in Romania (Tulcea County), with a small part in Ukraine (Odesa Oblast). Its approximate surface area is 4,152 square kilometres (1,603 square miles), of which 3,446 km2 (1,331 sq mi) is in Romania. With the lagoons of Razim–Sinoe (1,015 km2 or 392 sq mi with 865 km2 or 334 sq mi water surface), located south of the main delta, the total area of the Danube Delta is 5,165 km2 (1,994 sq mi). The Razim–Sinoe lagoon complex is geologically and ecologically related to the delta proper; the combined territory is listed as a World Heritage Site.

 The Danube Delta in 1867, as a part of the Ottoman Empire

Recorded history notes that the Dacians lived in the Danube Delta before it was conquered by the Romans. After later invasion by the Goths, the region changed hands many times. During the 15th century, the Danube Delta became part of the Ottoman Empire. In 1812, following the Russo-Turkish War, the borders of the Ottoman and Russian Empires were set by the Kilia and Old Stambul Channels of the Danube, and in 1829 by the St George Channel. The Treaty of Paris of 1856, which ended the Crimean War, assigned the Danube Delta to the Ottoman Empire and established an international commission which undertook a series of works to help navigation. In 1878, following the defeat of Ottoman Empire by Russia and Romania, the border between the two countries was set by the Kilia and Old Stambul Channels.

In 1991, the Romanian part of the Danube Delta became part of UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites. Around 2,733 km2 of the delta are strictly protected areas.

In 1998, under UNESCO's Programme on Man and the Biosphere, the 6,264.03 km2 of the Danube Delta were established as a biosphere reserve, shared by Romania and Ukraine.

Historically, in Romania, part of the Danube Delta was marked as a reserve in 1938.

In Ukraine, the Danube branch of the Black Sea State Reserve was established in 1973. In 1981, it was reorganized into the Natural Reserve "Danube Fluxes", and in 1998, it was extended into the Danube biosphere reserve.

Photographies by:
No machine-readable author provided. Kafka~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). - Public domain
Spiridon MANOLIU - Public domain
No machine-readable author provided. Kafka~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). - Public domain
Raff - CC BY 2.0
Spiridon Ion Cepleanu - CC BY-SA 4.0
RudolfSimon - CC BY-SA 3.0
Zones
Statistics: Position
2625
Statistics: Rank
46483

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
Security
397146582Click/tap this sequence: 4823
Esta pregunta es para comprobar si usted es un visitante humano y prevenir envíos de spam automatizado.

Google street view

Videos

Where can you sleep near Danube Delta ?

Booking.com
543.243 visits in total, 9.237 Points of interest, 405 Destinations, 360 visits today.