Northern Catalonia

Context of Northern Catalonia

Northern Catalonia (Catalan: Catalunya (del) Nord [kətəˈluɲə (ðəl) ˈnɔɾt]; French: Catalogne (du) Nord [katalɔɲ nɔʁ]; Occitan: Catalonha (del) Nòrd; Spanish: Cataluña (del) Norte), French Catalonia or Roussillon refers to the Catalan-speaking and Catalan-culture territory ceded to France by Spain through the signing of the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 in exchange of France's effective renunciation on the formal protection that it had given to the recently founded Catalan Republic. The area corresponds roughly to the modern French département of the Pyrénées-Orientales which were historically part of Catalonia since the old County of Barcelona, and lasted during the times of the Crown of Aragon and ...Read more

Northern Catalonia (Catalan: Catalunya (del) Nord [kətəˈluɲə (ðəl) ˈnɔɾt]; French: Catalogne (du) Nord [katalɔɲ nɔʁ]; Occitan: Catalonha (del) Nòrd; Spanish: Cataluña (del) Norte), French Catalonia or Roussillon refers to the Catalan-speaking and Catalan-culture territory ceded to France by Spain through the signing of the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 in exchange of France's effective renunciation on the formal protection that it had given to the recently founded Catalan Republic. The area corresponds roughly to the modern French département of the Pyrénées-Orientales which were historically part of Catalonia since the old County of Barcelona, and lasted during the times of the Crown of Aragon and the Principality of Catalonia until they were given to France by Spain.

The equivalent term in French, Catalogne Nord, is used nowadays, although less often than the more politically neutral Roussillon (Catalan: Rosselló), notwithstanding the fact that this term is geographically and historically inaccurate because it ignores Vallespir, Conflent and Cerdagne (Catalan: Cerdanya). The term used nowadays is Pays Catalan (Catalan: Pais Català).

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